A book report on the bridge at andau by james a michener

The book was published just months later, and Michener goes to great pains to detail his reporting practices and dedication to truth, knowing full well that the incredible stories he recounts are beyond belief. He also understands that, inmuch of the world is still on the fence about the James Michener was right there at the Bridge at Andau, watching and helping some of theHungarian refugees that fled to safety into Austria in the weeks following the five-day Revolution in He also understands that, inmuch of the world is still on the fence about the merits of Communism and whether Russia is as evil as the Americans say.

A book report on the bridge at andau by james a michener

The book was published just months later, and Michener goes to great pains to detail his reporting practices and dedication to truth, knowing full well that the incredible stories he recounts are beyond belief.

He also understands that, inmuch of the world is still on the fence about the James Michener was right there at the Bridge at Andau, watching and helping some of theHungarian refugees that fled to safety into Austria in the weeks following the five-day Revolution in He also understands that, inmuch of the world is still on the fence about the merits of Communism and whether Russia is as evil as the Americans say.

For this reason, the Bridge at Andau serves as an excellent historical account of the Russian occupation of Hungary and mid-century American attitudes toward Communism and immigration.

Michener is clearly worried about the spread of Communism, a fear that means next to nothing in So the book has a dated quality but it's one that serves the subject well, as it's a very honest account and analysis of Communism as it was in the s.

It's also a serious love letter to Hungary and the Hungarians. About two-thirds in, Michener admits he is decidedly pro-Hungary, a crush that began when he boned up on Hungarian history in an effort to play devil's advocate to his Transylvanian roommate's frequent rants against his former oppressors.

The author is clearly fond of the Hungarian people, and occasionally lays on the praise a bit thick, gushing about the strength and character of these "remarkably attractive people. Small, wiry, quick to anger, they have finely chiseled faces and bodies admirably adapted to games.

I also recently fell in love with Hungary, first through studying it and then living there for three months. And, yes, Hungarians are hotties, at least the ones I met in Budapest were.

But as a historian, Michener might have toned it down a notch for the sake of accuracy. I also cringed at how he rated the "three waves of refugees," deeming the Second Wave—the only one he actually witnessed—as the one most worthy of emigration, because this group, he believes, held the most brave revolutionaries.

The first wave, he says, was prostitutes, ne'er-de-wells, and cowards, and terrible ambassadors of Hungary. The third wave, a fullof the , were, he says, not brave enough to fight in the revolution and jumped ship when the going got worse, thus did not earn the right to flee and are not befitting of hero refugee status.

I finished this book the same day President Trump called Africa and Haiti "shitholes" and, indeed, Michener recounts likeminded racist words from mid-century American politicians who also didn't want dirty refugees from the shithole situation that was Hungary.

The United States was initially reluctant to accept Hungarians and greeted the first few arrivals very poorly. By September of we had accepted 35, Hungarian refugees. Michener does an awful lot of speculating about the future for Hungary and Hungarians, both in governing and social roles.

This was likely a useful viewpoint inbut today it feels quaint and much of his fears never came to pass. Yet, his observations are a useful study of American, or perhaps Western, opinion of refugees and Communism, and an exciting account of the Hungarian Revolution.

I'm glad the author was alive in to see Hungary freed from Communism.James Albert Michener (/ ˈ m ɪ tʃ n ər /; February 3, – October 16, ) was an American author of more than 40 books, most of which were fictional, lengthy family sagas covering the lives of many generations in particular geographic locales and incorporating solid history.

Michener had numerous bestsellers and works selected for Book of the . "The Bridge at Andau," by James Albert Michener, is based on interviews with survivors of the Hungarian uprising against communist Soviet occupation.

Written in , the book was checked out of the Depot library five times during the late 50s and early 60s.5/5(5). The Bridge at Andau is James A. Michener at his most gripping. His classic nonfiction account of a doomed uprising is as searing and unforgettable as any of his bestselling novels.

His classic nonfiction account of a doomed uprising is as searing and unforgettable as any of his bestselling novels.5/5(3). Bridge at Andau rare book for sale.

This First Edition, Signed by James MICHENER is available at Bauman Rare Books. About The Bridge at Andau. The Bridge at Andau is James A.

Michener at his most gripping. His classic nonfiction account of a doomed uprising is as searing and unforgettable as any of his bestselling novels. About book: At four o'clock in the morning on a Sunday in November , the city of Budapest was awakened by the shattering sound of Russian tanks tearing the city apart.

A book report on the bridge at andau by james a michener

The Hungarian revolution -- five brief, glorious days of freedom that had yielded a glimpse at a different kind of future -- was over.

The Bridge at Andau - Wikipedia